Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future by Peter Thiel

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Book #4: Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future
by Peter Thiel ‪#‎100BooksChallenge2016‬

Favourite Take Aways

  • You can’t escape the madness of crowds by dogmatically rejecting them. Instead ask yourself: how much of what you know about business is shaped by mistaken reactions to past mistakes? The most contrarian thing of all is not to oppose the crowd but to think for yourself.

Optimists welcome the future; pessimists fear it. Combining these possibilities yields four views:

Indefinite Optimism:

To an indefinite optimist, the future will be better, but he doesn’t know how exactly, so he won’t make any specific plans. He expects to profit from the future but sees no reason to design it concretely.

Definite Optimism :
To a definite optimist, the future will be better than the present if he plans and works to make it better.

Definite Pessimism :
A definite pessimist believes the future can be known, but since it will be bleak, he must prepare for it.

Indefinite Pessimism:
An indefinite pessimist looks out onto a bleak future, but he has no idea what to do about it.

  • There are two kinds of secrets: secrets of nature and secrets about people. Natural secrets exist all around us; to find them, one must study some undiscovered aspect of the physical world.
  • Secrets about people are different: they are things that people don’t know about themselves or things they hide because they don’t want others to know. So when thinking about what kind of company to build, there are two distinct questions to ask: What secrets is nature not telling you? What secrets are people not telling you?
  • Whatever your views on thermodynamics, it’s a powerful metaphor: in business, equilibrium means stasis, and stasis means death. If your industry is in a competitive equilibrium, the death of your business won’t matter to the world; some other undifferentiated competitor will always be ready to take your place.
  • Always err on the side of starting too small. The reason is simple: it’s easier to dominate a small market than a large one. If you think your initial market might be too big, it almost certainly is.
  • The perfect target market for a startup is a small group of particular people concentrated together and served by few or no competitors. Any big market is a bad choice, and a big market already served by competing companies is even worse.
  • Our Schools teach every young person the same subjects in mostly the same ways, irrespective of individual talents and preferences. Students who don’t learn best by sitting still at a desk are made to feel somehow inferior, while children who excel on conventional measures like tests and assignments end up defining their identities in terms of this weirdly contrived academic parallel reality. And it gets worse as students ascend to higher levels of the tournament.
  • Elite students climb confidently until they reach a level of competition sufficiently intense to beat their dreams out of them. Higher education is the place where people who had big plans in high school get stuck in fierce rivalries with equally smart peers over conventional careers like management consulting and for the privilege of being turned into conformists, students (or their families) pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in skyrocketing tuition that continues to outpace inflation. Why are we doing this to ourselves?
  • If you can identify a delusional popular belief, you can find what lies hidden behind it: the contrarian truth.

Quotes

  • Unless you have perfectly conventional beliefs, it’s rarely a good idea to tell everybody everything that you know.
  • Winning is better than losing, but everybody loses when the war isn’t one worth fighting.
  • Business is like chess. Grandmaster José Raúl Capablanca put it well: to succeed, “you must study the endgame before everything else.”
  • “Shallow men believe in luck, believe in circumstances.… Strong men believe in cause and effect.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Lanre Dahunsi is an Entrepreneur/ Digital Marketing Strategist. He is the Chief Digital Strategist of Cnergy Media (A Digital Marketing Consulting Firm). He is also the Team Lead of OpportunitiesForAfricans.com: An Online portal that connect Africans to the Latest life changing opportunities. around the globe. Lanre is an Avid Reader, Life Long Learner, Self Motivated Change Agent and Language Polyglot ( He speaks English and French). Shoot Lanre a Mail : lanredahunsi@yahoo.com or mail@lanredahunsi.com

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